We're now in the thick of the holiday season throughout the Great Garden State. A time of year when tips go flying everywhere to seemingly everyone.

That, of course, is a tradition during the holiday season. With so many going above and beyond for us, it's only right we show them a little gratitude as we approach Christmas.

Now perhaps one reason some might hold back on tipping this year is because of how expensive things have become. It's no secret that we're all paying a heck of a lot more for even the most basic of items.

Still, it's good to show certain people that what they do matters to us. So before we look at the sole group that maybe shouldn't get an extra holiday tip this year, let's briefly highlight the ones who should get a little something extra.

And please keep in mind that a tip doesn't necessarily have to be cash as some workers may not be allowed to accept cash.

Holiday tip / tipping
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Package delivery workers

Doesn't matter which big company it is, package delivery workers should get a little something extra for the holidays. Yes, they deliver packages all year long, but this time of year is different.

With so many gifts being shipped across the country and the world, delivery workers will more likely than not be dealing with a huge surge of drop-offs. That in turn will force them to work well into the night trying to make those deliveries on time.

And let's not forget about those who deliver on the weekends. With such a burden added to their plate, the least we could do is give them a little extra for that direct service they provide us.

Package Shipping Companies Rush To Delivery Backlog Of Christmas Packages
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Postal workers

This one's even more personal than the delivery worker. Your local mail carrier delivers mail every single week to you.

Now yes, most of it is probably junk mail, along with bills that we'd rather not open. But let's be honest, isn't that what mail consisted of going back to the early days?

Of course, it's a bit different this time of year with holiday cards and gifts also included in the mix. And if you've gotten to know your mail carrier on any level, or if they've been delivering to you for a long time, it would be nice to leave them a little something extra.

A postal worker loads a delivery vehicle at the United States Post Office in Cranberry Township, Pa.,
A postal worker loads a delivery vehicle at the United States Post Office in Cranberry Township, Pa., (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
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Sanitation workers

Sanitation workers absolutely should get recognized during the holidays. Especially the ones who still work with the old-fashioned trucks.

Before the big claw grabbed the barrels, workers had to hang onto the truck where the garbage goes in. Every time the truck stops, they run over and grab your barrel to unload it for you.

It's a very dirty job and one that's provided to us throughout the year in New Jersey. We should recognize that during the holidays.

Garbage truck
Hopfphotography, ThinkStock
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Anyone else that provides you with a direct service

Babysitters, pet sitters, personal trainers, landscapers, hair stylists, and more. Those regulars who take good care of you throughout the year in any capacity.

This list, of course, is larger than what's mentioned above, but you get the idea. It's about the people who provide that extra service for us (Check out Judi Franco's expanded list here).

As for who to avoid? All we have to do is look at the out-of-control tip culture that's overtaken New Jersey since the pandemic.

Tipping / Leaving a tip / No assistance
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Anything that contributes to today's ridiculous tip culture

Plain and simple. If you feel like a tip is being demanded out of you when no extra service is provided, which includes the holidays, then don't feel obligated to leave anything in the first place.

It's that tipping culture that exists today where everyone under the sun feels like they deserve something regardless if they even earned it, or if they did anything extra for you throughout the year. Yes, it's nice to be generous during the holidays, but any place that feels the need to guilt a tip out of you for absolutely no reason should be left alone.

Now, are there exceptions to this? Sure. If, for example, you'd like to take care of a regular at any business, then absolutely do it.

But I think most understand what I mean when I mention tip culture. It's not trying to be a Grinch to everyone, it's just pointing out where tips, especially during the holidays, have become a huge problem.

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Make your best judgment

Look, just because it's the holiday season doesn't mean all workers don't deserve anything extra. Just be wary of these apps, auto prompts, and expectations that guilt you into leaving a tip when nothing extra is being done for such a tip to be warranted.

Package delivery workers, mail carriers, and sanitation workers are the big ones we should keep in mind. They work extra hard during the holidays and should be recognized for what they do.

And of course, servers in restaurants that actually serve you at tables should always get tipped for great service. The same goes for bartenders who will always be there when we just need a good drink or two.

We don't need to tip everyone, especially with the New Jersey minimum wage as high as it is. Not to mention, how expensive everything's become. That expectation for nothing is part of what's contributing to today's problematic tip culture.

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The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 Sunday morning host Mike Brant. Any opinions expressed are his own.

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