Well, the day we all have been dreading is here. The first case of the new COVID-19 variant has reached new Jersey. The omicron variant was just detected in the United States a few days ago, and it has already spread throughout the different states. California, Colorado, Hawaii, Minnesota, Nebraska, and New York have all confirmed Omicron cases.

Earlier today the first Omicron case was announced in Philadelphia, and shortly after we are hearing that it is here in New Jersey as well.

So what does this mean? Officials have been saying that this new variant is one of the worst Covid strains that we have seen. Does this mean we should be worried? Will our lives be turned upside down once again? Well here is what we know.

According to NJ.com, a woman from Georgia recently traveled to New Jersey from South Africa and tested positive for the Omicron variant. The woman is fully vaccinated. She has been in isolation ever since she tested positive on Nov. 28 and thankfully her symptoms are under control.

My first thought when I first heard of Omicron is "will we have to go back in lockdown." Panic instantly crept over me, because I think I still have PTSD from 2020 and everything we as Americans had to endure. The thought of going back to that scares me. As of now, city officials are simply warning people to reconsider holiday gatherings this year.

Let's just remember that we are nowhere near done with this pandemic so it is important to not get comfortable and let our guard down. Where you mask, social distance, and be smart!

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.