The City of Philadelphia will some of the limits set on the capacity of events (both indoor and outdoor) beginning this Friday. The announcement was made during the city's coronavirus press conference on Tuesday (October 13).

This means that events (Including weddings, concerts, and sporting events) can take place in the city, with hefty guidelines, but a larger capacity than what was previously allowed.

So, yes, this even the Philadelphia Eagles. Moments after the updated guidelines were issued by the city, the Eagles (and Lincoln Financial Field) issued a statement saying fans WILL BE ALLOWED in the stadium for this Sunday's game against the Baltimore Ravens. They will be following strict guidelines. Tickets will first be made available to season ticket holders, they say.

The updated guidelines, which Philadelphia officials issued moments ago, allow for a maximum of 7,500 people at an outdoor venue in some of the city’s largest spaces. Smaller crowds are allowed inside, as experts have said the risk of transmission of COVID-19 is greater indoors.

Safety guidelines will be in place (including strict mask and social distancing policies) across the city. And this only applies to events. Events, which are classified as a temporary grouping of people for a  defined purpose, include concerts, fairs, festivals, and more.

Here’s a breakdown of the updated order from the city:

Indoor events

  • 0-2,000 people – 10% of maximum occupancy
  • More than 2,000 people – 10% of maximum occupancy, up to 250 people
  • No seating or maximum undefined – 10 persons per 1,000 square feet, up to 250 people

Outdoor events

  • 0 - 2,000 people – 20% of maximum occupancy
  • 2,001 - 10,000 people – 15% of maximum occupancy
  • Over 10,000 people – 15% of maximum occupancy, up to 7,500 people
  • No seating or maximum undefined – 15% of 67 people per 1,000 square feet, up to 7,500 people

The limits are all percentages derived from the fire code. As an example, this means that a 500 person indoor wedding venue could allow 50 guests.

The city’s guidance follows last week’s news from Governor Tom Wolf, which allowed similar measures for the rest of the state.