The Princeton Tigers, along with the rest of the Ivy League, will not be playing football, or any other sports this fall.

In a statement, the Ivy League Council of Presidents said, “With the safety and well-being of students as their highest priority, Ivy League institutions are implementing campus-wide policies including restrictions on student and staff travel, requirements for social distancing, limits on group gatherings, and regulations for visitors to campus.” Given those restrictions, it was determined that “it will not be possible for Ivy League teams to participate in intercollegiate athletics competition prior to the end of the fall semester.”

That makes the Ivy League the first Division 1 conference to cancel all fall athletic activities. While the Ivy League doesn’t compete in the highest level of D1 football (the FBS), they could be a harbinger of what’s to come for other schools; after all, the Ivies were the first to cancel their postseason basketball tournament because of the pandemic and the other conferences (and the NCAA as a whole) followed soon after. Then again, the Ivies don’t award athletic scholarships and aren’t dependent on football television money to subsidize their entire athletics department.

Basketball and cross country will also be put in limbo. A decision on winter and spring sports will be made at a future date. For now, limited practices and workouts will be allowed on campus. According to ESPN.com, college football as a whole will be re-evaluated toward the end of July, “Multiple decision-makers have told ESPN that late July is the tentative benchmark to reevaluate if the college football season can start on time -- or at all -- and what it might look like.”

So, will the Greg Schiano Era (The Sequel) get started this season for Rutgers? We should find out in a couple of weeks. By the way, Princeton’s football team went 8-2 last year; not too shabby.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle. Any opinions expressed are Bill Doyle's own.