What's the coldest, snowiest winter you can remember in New Jersey?

We can all remember a few New Jersey winters that were for the books. Feet upon feet of snow and ice, days of shoveling, multiple school closings, and freezing temperatures.

Safety on the winter road
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For example, how about the Blizzard of '96? For two days, from Jan 6 - Jan 8, 1996, a monster snowstorm delivered over 30 inches of snow to the Northeast. Schools had to close for a week!

 

But in terms of temperature,  all of that was nothing compared to the winter of 1961 in New Jersey - the state's coldest winter ever on record, according to OnlyInYourState. Compared to the temperatures New Jerseyans experienced back then, today's winters are Hawaiian in comparison.

City courtyard during a snowfall. View from above
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In the winter of 1961, temperatures stayed below freezing for a harsh 17 days from January 19 - February 3. And just for comparison's sake - that's the average winter temperature in Alaska!

Photo by Rod Long on Unsplash
Photo by Rod Long on Unsplash
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Realistically speaking, most people who were around in 1961 who would be old enough to remember this Alaskan winter in New Jersey are most likely no longer around. But boy, would it be cool (no pun intended) to hear about what they had to endure for those arctic 17 days.

Parked Car With Heavy Snow
Robert Abbott Sengstacke
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I'm sure glad I wasn't around back then! Heck, not even my parents were around yet! You wouldn't catch me outside for more than 5 minutes.

Do you or anyone you know remember that winter over 60 years ago? Hopefully we won't ever have a winter that cold ever again!


LOOK: Biggest snowfalls recorded in New Jersey history

Stacker compiled a list of the biggest 1-day snowfalls in New Jersey using data from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

Gallery Credit: Stacker

First flakes: When does snow season start in NJ?

Gallery Credit: Dan Zarrow

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