Dress codes are common in schools but online? Does it really matter?

The Springfield School District in Illinois is making national headlines after saying that students who will do remote learning must adhere to a dress code. The New York Times reports that students will not be allowed to wear pajamas, slippers, or hats just because they are at home.

Bree Hankins, a district spokesperson, said in a statement,

Our hope is that students approach remote learning as they would in a classroom setting, to the extent possible given each student’s individual circumstances.

In addition, the school board says that students must be sitting at a desk or table when attending online class.

Hankins said the decision was a collaborative decision made by school officials, administrators, and parents. However, many parents disagree and think the school shouldn't have a say what happens at the home and have more important things to worry about, per WCIA.

Springfield Public Schools has about 14,000 students and all will start the school year in a hybrid program -- 3 days a week at home, 2 days a week in-person.

The President of the Springfield Education Association told WCIA that in reality, enforcing the rule will be towards the bottom of their list and will be handled on an individual basis, if necessary. In general, the school board's hope by requiring the dress code be followed, is that students approach online learning the same way they would if they were in the actual classroom.

The district handbook can be found here. The topic of dress codes can be found on pages 19-20.

Since many Americans have been working from home because of the pandemic, several workers have admitted to working in their pajamas, boxers, and even doing conference calls on the toilet. The way I see it is, if the child looks presentable on the top and is covered up, who cares if he's wearing slippers while learning a new math problem?

What are your thoughts? Should the same thing be implemented in Michigan schools?