Just in time for ski  and winter sports season, Ski Barn in Lawrence Township, NJ, will be reopening soon, fully stocked, after the flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Ida damaged the popular retail store.

When I drove by this afternoon, I noticed the announcement in the window that reads, "Hit By Hurricane Ida! Fully-stocked new store coming soon!" Great news. I cant wait to check it out and support this local business.

That area of Lawrence Township, particularly the stretch of Route 1 from Franklin Corner Road to 295 got hit hard by flooding. It took days for the water to recede and it left a path of destruction. A section of the road had to be quickly repaired and repaved before it could be reopened, which caused a traffic nightmare throughout the area for days.

I felt so badly when day after day, since the storm, I'd drive by and see that the store was still closed. Most of the local businesses surrounding it have reopened since the flooding, but, not Ski Barn. I knew they had to have been hit hard because of all the work trucks and dumpsters in front of the store.

But, things are looking up. I'll let you know when I hear about a grand re-opening date.

Make sure to stop by and check out the new store once it opens. Shop for winter gear and apparel, plus, when the weather starts to warm up again, shop summer furnishings, like patio sets, chairs, umbrellas, and more.

Ski Barn is located at 2990 Brunswick Pike (Route 1 North) in Lawrence Township.

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